Chalkboard rule 36:  The most important skill in an ever-changing world is evaluation.  From Andrew Wulf’s programming blog thecodist.com:
This isn’t obvious to everyone, but the ability to see something new, or see what others are doing, or to compare multiple ways of doing something and then pick the best option for you, your team, your project or even your company is incredibly valuable. Most people I’ve seen are not very good at this. Most leaders are really terrible at this. It’s easy to just do what someone tells you you should do or something you read in a blog or just do what everyone else is doing. It’s much more difficult to look at things from all sides and your needs and pick something that seems to be best at that point. Of course you have to make some decision, people are often paralyzed by having to evaluate which often leads to picking something random or following the herd.

 

Chalkboard rule 36:  The most important skill in an ever-changing world is evaluation.  From Andrew Wulf’s programming blog thecodist.com:

This isn’t obvious to everyone, but the ability to see something new, or see what others are doing, or to compare multiple ways of doing something and then pick the best option for you, your team, your project or even your company is incredibly valuable. Most people I’ve seen are not very good at this. Most leaders are really terrible at this. It’s easy to just do what someone tells you you should do or something you read in a blog or just do what everyone else is doing. It’s much more difficult to look at things from all sides and your needs and pick something that seems to be best at that point. Of course you have to make some decision, people are often paralyzed by having to evaluate which often leads to picking something random or following the herd.

 

Soylent.  Bye, hunger.

Soylent. Bye, hunger.

Chalkboard rule 35:  vulnerability and courage come hand-in-hand.

Chalkboard rule 35: vulnerability and courage come hand-in-hand.

>putting new electronics into guitar
>new pots, switch, and jack, should be good
>try to stick the first pot into the hole in the guitar’s body
>fuckfuck.bmp
>the pot’s diameter is larger than the hole’s
>can’t fit it through
>idea.gif
>take cutco-brand scissors
>disassemble, stick one blade into the hole
>proceed to drill with scissors
>everything looks good
>wait
>hole’s now oblong
>but the pot fits
>eh.tiff
>so the pot sits

Chalkboard rule 34: “One of the cruelest things you can do to another person is pretend you care about them more than you really do.” -Douglas Coupland

Chalkboard rule 34: “One of the cruelest things you can do to another person is pretend you care about them more than you really do.” -Douglas Coupland

Studio session. #skywalkers (at Soundscape Studios)

Studio session. #skywalkers (at Soundscape Studios)

Chalkboard rule 33:  we will have our devils if we are worth a damn.

Chalkboard rule 33:  we will have our devils if we are worth a damn.

There were demonic spirits boasting about all my unwashed dishes,
Rotors finding rhythm with the dribbling of the faucet,
A window open to the singing neighbors down a story,
And a mesh screen fastened over all the hatches

The ebbing, flowing fever spreads my limbs to the four corners
Of my bed, and not a one shuffled back with a potion like they’d promised
The work I haven’t done is sitting somewhere in a backpack
This must be the way my body learned treasonous habits

Chalkboard rule 32:  we learn to obviate our fears. As in, that’s one of the many reasons why we learn.

Chalkboard rule 32: we learn to obviate our fears. As in, that’s one of the many reasons why we learn.

I strapped a broken guitar pick to my ankle
and strummed footsteps into the earth.
This was my last rite of reconciliation
for the unsung songs; I carried a few milligrams
of resolution: the weight of their spent exhortation
and the flecking of their allusive spray. 
This was how they found me, chanting with 
the soles of my feet, the little mole on the right
ridge making itself known to the northern dirt.

killing yourself

implies that the first

suggestion to come back

from the semantic engine

powering google

will be your name and

death, glued together collaboratively

by buckshot, hemp fibers, and

the crowd of inquiring strangers

who unfortunately couldn’t know you

and all they can scrabble out of your

dust are confused rumors, scattered

with the four winds to the corners

of every wasteland wiki, opinions

of some garbler who picked clean

every hungover interview, and

the purloined liner notes

they just can’t not be obsessed

with your depression, what

drove you to hop off of the perch

of engraved music majesty

cut from hot fingerpicked rocks 

and if there is such a thing as the

underworld, it resides in the urge

to ask nothing but why, why did

he sing such choking notes

I don’t pick up pennies that show me their tail.

Sometimes we lose, and we must be beautiful enough losers

to designate a winner and wish them good luck.

It’s training for the day when I write my will.

Aug. 5, 2014
  • More work, today.  Posted up with my guitar and tried making some spur-of-the-moment songs; determined that it’s much harder to be John Darnielle or Will Sheff than it appears to be.  Still, I got some interesting recordings that I can listen to in forty years’ time.
  • Went to Aikido.  Vasish was around, and we partnered up to practice the day’s technique; pretty sure he thinks I’m a prick for correcting him as much as I did (you don’t have to flop around! step with the opposite foot! actually try to grab me! I shouldn’t have to cross the entire mat to grab you; we should be one step away from each other!), but we’re wasting our time if we don’t try to figure out what we’ve done wrong and how we can do it better.  Hell, I’d welcome critiques; Alex gave me a few, and I was grateful; helped me understand the technique better.
  • Played a SKYWALKERS show at the Elbo Room.  Whiffed my only solo, and figured out my pickups were squawking and missing tone because they could be leveled higher.  All in all, a learning experience, but I don’t know how many more shows I can have that aren’t that instructive for the audience.  Also!  Pedal boards rock, and a guitarist for the band that went on after us had a cool-looking one.